Sante Fe Residence
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Ext Glass Wall Mirror 1.jpg
       
     
 Architecture inspired by the sublime, timeless quality of the New Mexico high desert
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Glass Hall cropped.jpg
       
     
 Load bearing glass walls used here for the first time
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Master Bath cropped.jpg
       
     
 Tempering of the intense desert sunlight
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Sunscreen from Inside cropped.jpg
       
     
 Weathered zinc, grainy basalt, rich walnut & smooth, cool concrete - a poem of textures
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard 3.jpg
       
     
 Living with art & connecting to the landscape
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Office square.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Sky Space 2 cropped.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard Stacked Stone.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Suncreen Detail cropped.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard Evening.jpg
       
     
 ”We wanted to live with our art in a house that was also an extraordinary piece of architecture. Mark gave us that.” Jeanne Klein, Owner  Creating an ideal setting for living with a contemporary art collection, this house is acclaimed by Architectural Digest as “among the finest American homes built for art”. The house was designed around specific works of art including pieces by Ellsworth Kelly, Kiki Smith, Richard Serra and Donald Judd. A counterpoint to the panoramic views and the dramatic New Mexico skies, a James Turrell Skyspace embedded in the center of the house offers a contemplative experience of light and space.  Located on a rugged hillside site in the desert, the design resonates with the sublime, timeless quality of region. Paula Hayes designed the landscape around the house, blurring the distinction between art and nature, and the property includes site specific pieces by Olafur Eliasson and Andy Goldsworthy.  The materials palette of basalt, concrete, walnut and zinc form a simple, elegant backdrop for the collection of paintings, drawings, sculpture and video. The intense New Mexico sun is controlled and tempered by deep overhangs, north facing clerestories and frosted glass skylights. The overhangs and massive concrete walls keep the house cool in the summer, while solar gain falling on stone floors provides significant heating in the winter.    A unique structural glass wall is the only support for the cantilevered roof, the first time this has been done in North America. The sheer wall of glass dissolves the distinction between indoors and outdoors, opening the rooms out to the horizon and creating the ultimate glass house.
       
     
Sante Fe Residence
       
     
Sante Fe Residence
DuBois Santa Fe Ext Glass Wall Mirror 1.jpg
       
     
 Architecture inspired by the sublime, timeless quality of the New Mexico high desert
       
     

Architecture inspired by the sublime, timeless quality of the New Mexico high desert

DuBois Santa Fe Glass Hall cropped.jpg
       
     
 Load bearing glass walls used here for the first time
       
     

Load bearing glass walls used here for the first time

DuBois Santa Fe Master Bath cropped.jpg
       
     
 Tempering of the intense desert sunlight
       
     

Tempering of the intense desert sunlight

DuBois Santa Fe Sunscreen from Inside cropped.jpg
       
     
 Weathered zinc, grainy basalt, rich walnut & smooth, cool concrete - a poem of textures
       
     

Weathered zinc, grainy basalt, rich walnut & smooth, cool concrete - a poem of textures

DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard 3.jpg
       
     
 Living with art & connecting to the landscape
       
     

Living with art & connecting to the landscape

DuBois Santa Fe Office square.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Sky Space 2 cropped.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard Stacked Stone.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Suncreen Detail cropped.jpg
       
     
DuBois Santa Fe Courtyard Evening.jpg
       
     
 ”We wanted to live with our art in a house that was also an extraordinary piece of architecture. Mark gave us that.” Jeanne Klein, Owner  Creating an ideal setting for living with a contemporary art collection, this house is acclaimed by Architectural Digest as “among the finest American homes built for art”. The house was designed around specific works of art including pieces by Ellsworth Kelly, Kiki Smith, Richard Serra and Donald Judd. A counterpoint to the panoramic views and the dramatic New Mexico skies, a James Turrell Skyspace embedded in the center of the house offers a contemplative experience of light and space.  Located on a rugged hillside site in the desert, the design resonates with the sublime, timeless quality of region. Paula Hayes designed the landscape around the house, blurring the distinction between art and nature, and the property includes site specific pieces by Olafur Eliasson and Andy Goldsworthy.  The materials palette of basalt, concrete, walnut and zinc form a simple, elegant backdrop for the collection of paintings, drawings, sculpture and video. The intense New Mexico sun is controlled and tempered by deep overhangs, north facing clerestories and frosted glass skylights. The overhangs and massive concrete walls keep the house cool in the summer, while solar gain falling on stone floors provides significant heating in the winter.    A unique structural glass wall is the only support for the cantilevered roof, the first time this has been done in North America. The sheer wall of glass dissolves the distinction between indoors and outdoors, opening the rooms out to the horizon and creating the ultimate glass house.
       
     

”We wanted to live with our art in a house that was also an extraordinary piece of architecture. Mark gave us that.” Jeanne Klein, Owner

Creating an ideal setting for living with a contemporary art collection, this house is acclaimed by Architectural Digest as “among the finest American homes built for art”. The house was designed around specific works of art including pieces by Ellsworth Kelly, Kiki Smith, Richard Serra and Donald Judd. A counterpoint to the panoramic views and the dramatic New Mexico skies, a James Turrell Skyspace embedded in the center of the house offers a contemplative experience of light and space.

Located on a rugged hillside site in the desert, the design resonates with the sublime, timeless quality of region. Paula Hayes designed the landscape around the house, blurring the distinction between art and nature, and the property includes site specific pieces by Olafur Eliasson and Andy Goldsworthy.

The materials palette of basalt, concrete, walnut and zinc form a simple, elegant backdrop for the collection of paintings, drawings, sculpture and video. The intense New Mexico sun is controlled and tempered by deep overhangs, north facing clerestories and frosted glass skylights. The overhangs and massive concrete walls keep the house cool in the summer, while solar gain falling on stone floors provides significant heating in the winter.

A unique structural glass wall is the only support for the cantilevered roof, the first time this has been done in North America. The sheer wall of glass dissolves the distinction between indoors and outdoors, opening the rooms out to the horizon and creating the ultimate glass house.